Fact Check: The Trump COVID Vaccine Plan for the U.S. Does NOT Rely On Forced Inoculation

Fact Check

  • by: Dean Miller
Fact Check: The Trump COVID Vaccine Plan for the U.S. Does NOT  Rely On Forced Inoculation Martial flaw

Is forced vaccination of the unwilling part of the COVID-19 vaccination plan released by the Trump administration? No, that's not true: Both the vaccination plan itself and public statements by U.S. health officials emphasize free vaccines -- once developed -- will be voluntary. The website making the claim provides no proof that forced vaccination is planned.

The forced vaccination claim appeared in a September 16, 2020, article (archived here) published by BeforeItsNews.com, titled "The Government Has Released Their Initial Plans To Force a Vaccine on EVERYONE" which opened:

Earlier today, the Trump administration released its plans to vaccine everyone in a short time. Three potential vaccines are currently in Stage 3 trials in the United States and could be ready in weeks, President Donald Trump said Tuesday. Time is running out. And Trump has the military lined up..."

Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail:

The Government Has Released Their Initial Plans To Force a Vaccine on EVERYONE | Survival | Before It's News

Earlier today, the Trump administration released its plans to vaccine everyone in a short time. Three potential vaccines are currently in Stage 3 trials in the United States and could be ready in weeks, President Donald Trump said Tuesday. Time is running out. And Trump has the military lined up...

The U.S. military's role is strictly limited to support for the distribution of vaccines that can't be distributed by normal means, Department of Defense Spokesman Chuck Prichard wrote in an October 2, 2020, email response to Lead Stories:

Our best military assessment is that there is sufficient U.S. commercial transportation capacity to fully support vaccine distribution. There should be no need for a large commitment of DOD units or personnel to support the nationwide distribution of vaccines. Any DOD required support would be by exception. For example, military air assets may be called upon to deliver vaccines to a remote location only if no other means of transportation is feasible."

Prichard said there is no other role for military personnel: "DOD has no plans regarding vaccine distribution beyond what I have described above and what is stated in the HHS/CDC distribution plan." Prichard, asked if the military will coerce citizens into being vaccinated, was direct. "The answer is no," he wrote.

Details of the military's role in distribution are covered in this news release and the following infographic, he noted.

DOD.OWS.JPG

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, has said repeatedly there is no plan to make COVID-19 vaccine mandatory. At an August 19, 2020, event at George Washington University he was asked if the federal government plans to force vaccination and Fauci said it does not:

No. Definitely not. You don't want to mandate and force anyone to take the vaccine. We've never done that. You can mandate certain groups of people, like health workers, but the general population you cannot...We don't want to be mandating from the federal government to the general public. It would be unenforceable."

Lead Stories did not uncover any reference to forced vaccination in the national vaccine distribution plan referred to in the BeforeItsNews article, using the terms "require, force, consent and mandatory" and other words that would be needed to describe forced vaccination. The plan, "COVID-19 Vaccination Program Interim Playbook for Jurisdiction Operations," is available online.

Following are screengrabs of the results of searches for those words the document.

The word "mandatory" does not appear in the document.

2020-10-02 (9).png

The word "force" mostly showed up in reference to planning for "workforce" requirements.

2020-10-02 (11).png

"Required" showed up 52 times, as the plan requires states to manage numerous safety and record-keeping efforts.

2020-10-02 (5).png

There is no reference in the document to "consent" nor the lack thereof.

2020-10-02 (14).png

NewsGuard, a company that uses trained journalist to rank the reliability of websites, describes beforeitsnews.com as:

A website that hosts user-submitted content and regularly publishes false information and conspiracy theories.

According to NewsGuard the site does not maintain basic standards of accuracy and accountability. Read their full assessment here.

Want to inform others about the accuracy of this story?

See who is sharing it (it might even be your friends...) and leave the link in the comments.:

Lead Stories is working with the CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance, a coalition of more than 100 fact-checkers who are fighting misinformation related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about the alliance here.


  Dean Miller

Lead Stories staff writer Dean Miller has edited daily and weekly newspapers, worked as a reporter for more than a decade and is co-author of two non-fiction books. After a one-year Harvard Nieman Fellowship, he served as Director of Stony Brook University’s Center for News Literacy for six years. As Senior Vice President/Content at Connecticut Public Broadcasting, a dual licensee, he oversaw radio, TV and print journalists, and documentary producers. He moved west to teach journalism at Western Washington University, edit The Port Townsend Leader and write the twice-weekly Save The Free Press column for the Seattle Times. Miller won the 2007 national Mirror Award for news industry coverage and he led the team that won the 2005 Scripps Howard first amendment prize. 

Read more about or contact Dean Miller

Different viewpoints

Note: if reading this fact check makes you want to contact us to complain about bias, please check out our Blue feed first.

About us

International Fact-Checking Organization

Lead Stories is a fact checking website that is always looking for the latest false, deceptive or inaccurate stories (or media) making the rounds on the internet.
Spotted something? Let us know!.

Lead Stories is a:


Follow us on social media

Most Read

Most Recent

Share your opinion