Fact Check: Dr. Vernon Coleman Does NOT Give 'Proof The COVID-19 Jabs Should Be Stopped Now'

Fact Check

  • by: Alexis Tereszcuk
Fact Check: Dr. Vernon Coleman Does NOT Give 'Proof The COVID-19 Jabs Should Be Stopped Now' No Proof

Does Dr. Vernon Coleman give proof COVID-19 "jabs should be stopped now"? No, that's not true: He offers no evidence for why the COVID-19 vaccines should be stopped and cites unverified statistics about deaths from the vaccines. As of this writing on June 1, 2021, there have been no documented deaths due to the Pfizer, Moderna or J&J/Janssen vaccines.

The claim appeared as a Brand New Tube video published on June 1, 2021, titled "Proof the Covid-19 Jabs Should be Stopped Now" (archived here), which opens:

In this astonishingly destructive video, Dr Vernon Coleman produces new evidence and annihilates the argument in favour of giving covid-19 jabs. He proves conclusively that all those advocating the covid-19 'vaccine

Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail:

Proof the Covid-19 Jabs Should be Stopped Now

In this astonishingly destructive video, Dr Vernon Coleman produces new evidence and annihilates the argument in favour of giving covid-19 jabs. He proves conclusively that all those advocating the covid-19 'vaccine

Coleman, a one-time general practitioner who relinquished his medical license, spends 26 minutes claiming COVID-19 "jabs should be stopped now" without providing any actual proof or evidence why and he uses unverified numbers in his claims.

At 5:50 in the video Coleman says:

... up until the end of May 2021 these vaccines had been responsible for 4,406 deaths in the United States and 1,213 deaths in the UK. Those are official government figures and they are low because less than 1 in 100 adverse events in the U.S. is reported.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 4,863 reports of death among people who received a vaccine. VAERS reports are not verified and do not provide sufficient evidence to determine whether a death was caused by a vaccine.

The website for VAERS clearly states the system's uses and limitations. The site reads:

A report to VAERS generally does not prove that the identified vaccine(s) caused the adverse event described. It only confirms that the reported event occurred sometime after vaccine was given. No proof that the event was caused by the vaccine is required in order for VAERS to accept the report. VAERS accepts all reports without judging whether the event was caused by the vaccine.

The CDC wrote;

A review of available clinical information, including death certificates, autopsy, and medical records has not established a causal link to COVID-19 vaccines. However, recent reports indicate a plausible causal relationship between the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine and a rare and serious adverse event--blood clots with low platelets--which has caused deaths.

As Lead Stories has previously reported, it's statistically inevitable that some people will get sick and die of unrelated causes after getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

At 10:14 in the video Coleman claims:

All this is particularly relevant when you remember that COVID-19 has a mortality rate which is much the same as that for the ordinary flu.

COVID-19 does not have a mortality rate similar to the flu. The number of people who died in the United States from COVID-19 was 594,000 as of May 31, 2021, which is almost 10 times as high as the 60,000 people who died in the 2017-18 flu season.

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Lead Stories is working with the CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance, a coalition of more than 100 fact-checkers who are fighting misinformation related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about the alliance here.


  Alexis Tereszcuk

Alexis Tereszcuk is a writer and fact checker at Lead Stories and an award-winning journalist who spent over a decade breaking hard news and celebrity scoop with RadarOnline and Us Weekly.

As the Entertainment Editor, she investigated Hollywood stories and conducted interviews with A-list celebrities and reality stars.  

Alexis’ crime reporting earned her spots as a contributor on the Nancy Grace show, CNN, Fox News and Entertainment Tonight, among others.

Read more about or contact Alexis Tereszcuk

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