Hoax Alert: Violent Rallies ARE NOT Planned for 37 US Cities - NOT being promoted on the Dark Web!

Fact Check

  • by: Alan Duke

A fake story claiming that "violent anti-police rallies" are planned for 37 U.S. cities Friday night is trending on Facebook and other social networks Tuesday, according to Lead Stories' Trendolizer. This may be the most dangerous and racist hoax ever detected by our social media analysis system as it could cause a violent reaction among readers who believe it to be true. It is not.

The hoax story purports that a "National Call to Action" for "A Day of Rage" against police brutality is being promoted on "the dark web." It lists 37 American cities targeted. The story does not cite sources, saying only the website has "obtained access to this information."

The story also includes fake statistics about the ratio of whites killed to black Americans by police.It concludes that blacks have nothing to riot about.

More white people have been killed by police than blacks, you don't see white people rioting and trying to kill police. Speaking of killing police, it should be noted that so far this year 124 police officers in the USA have been killed in the line of duty. That's right, more cops died than Blacks.

The story also warns of planned violence at the national political conventions in July with the goal of forcing the imposition of martial law and delaying the November presidential election.

One plan uncovered, which calls for turmoil and violence to be built-up and built-up on the way to its crescendo at the Republican and Democrat Conventions! This plan calls for so much violence, so much turmoil that the perpetrators hope to force the imposition of MARTIAL LAW, with the hope of actually postponing the election in November! That's the goal, America. Take away the most fundamental form of our advanced civilization! Voting.

When Lead Stories contacted the website that published the story, a man who answered claimed it was legitimate and his "newsroom" was affiliated with BridgeLight, a company that owns several Christian radio stations in the New York area.

A station manager for BridgeLight confirmed to Lead Stories that the website is not part of that organization. "This is definitely a hoax - that is our license but it is being misused to try to claim credibility. Thanks so much for taking the time to contact us and we will be taking this to the FCC."

If you see this hoax story posted on you Facebook timeline by a friend, please share this investigative report under it. There are other versions of the same hoax being shared, which have also been debunked by Snopes.com.

This graph shows the trend line for this story as calculated by Trendolizer.


  Alan Duke

Editor-in-Chief Alan Duke co-founded Lead Stories after ending a 26-year career with CNN, where he mainly covered entertainment, current affairs and politics. Duke closely covered domestic terrorism cases for CNN, including the Oklahoma City federal building bombing, the UNABOMBER and search for Southeast bomber Eric Robert Rudolph. CNN moved Duke to Los Angeles in 2009 to cover the entertainment beat. Duke also co-hosted a daily podcast with former HLN host Nancy Grace, "Crime Stories with Nancy Grace" and hosted the podcast series "Stan Lee's World: His Real Life Battle with Heroes & Villains." You'll also see Duke in many news documentaries, including on the Reelz channel, CNN and HLN.

Read more about or contact Alan Duke

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