Fake News: Doctors Did NOT Admit Crystal Meth Is Actually Good For You

Fact Check

  • by: Maarten Schenk
Fake News: Doctors Did NOT Admit Crystal Meth Is Actually Good For You

Did Department of Health spokesperson Dr. William Gould admit crystal meth is actually good for people? No, that's not true: the doctor is fictional and the story actually came from a satire website. None of it is real. Don't use meth.

The story went viral as an article published on September 30, 2018 on Huzlers titled "Doctors Admit "Crystal Meth Is Actually Good For You"" (archived here) which opened:

Doctors have today admitted that they have been wrong about crystal meth this whole time and that the powerful narcotic is actually amazingly beneficial for health and well being.

"It increases concentration and drive, providing a much needed energy boost for the carrying out of petty crimes and handbag robberies," confirmed Department of Health spokesperson Dr. William Gould. "A strict diet of crystal meth is shown to improve brain function making it easier to count coins collected on the street by begging with a coffee cup."

Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail, and if they were meth users they might have actually believed it was true:

Doctors Admit "Crystal Meth Is Actually Good For You"

Doctors have today admitted that they have been wrong about crystal meth this whole time and that the powerful narcotic is actually amazingly beneficial for health and well being. "It increases concentration and drive, providing a much needed energy boost for the carrying out of petty crimes and handbag robberies," confirmed Department of Health spokesperson ...

But the story then went on to describe the many "benefits" of meth, like shedding "unwanted pounds, hair and teeth" and the promotion of "the the growth of healthy scabs and unclean fingernails".

The story originally appeared on Wunderground, possibly in 2014:

"Crystal Meth Actually Good For You" Admit Doctors

Doctors have today admitted that they have been wrong about crystal meth this whole time and that the powerful narcotic is actually amazingly beneficial for health and well being. "It increases concentration and drive, providing a much needed energy boost for the carrying out of petty crimes and handbag robberies," confirmed Department of Health spokesperson...

The site describes itself like this:

Wunderground is a fictionalised, satirical publication. Proceed with caution. Use only as directed. Place device approx 12" from face and wear suitable gloves and face protection. In case of contact with your eyes, immediately seek medical attention. Keep out of reach of children and techno chin-strokers. Repeated exposure may cause dizziness, confusion and an obsession for stupid afterparty headlines. Memorising Wunderground may cause cancer. Contains waffle.

In addition to that, Huzlers (the site that copied the story) styles itself as a "fauxtire" website and carries a disclaimer at the bottom of each page:

Huzlers.com is the most infamous fauxtire & satire entertainment website in the world. If it's trending on social media you'll find it here!

According to Splinter News the site is run by Pablo Reyes and David Martinez and according to Buzzfeed Reyes is involved with several other fake news websites. They tend to shy away from political stories, opting instead to write for a more "urban" audience, with stories about rappers, criminals and celebrities.

We wrote about huzlers.com before, here are our most recent articles that mention the site:

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  Maarten Schenk

Lead Stories co-founder Maarten Schenk is our resident expert on fake news and hoax websites. He likes to go beyond just debunking trending fake news stories and is endlessly fascinated by the dazzling variety of psychological and technical tricks used by the people and networks who intentionally spread made-up things on the internet.  He can often be found at conferences and events about fake news, disinformation and fact checking when he is not in his office in Belgium monitoring and tracking the latest fake article to go viral.

Read more about or contact Maarten Schenk

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