Fact Check: Pfizer Scientists Did NOT Warn Of Weekly Vaccinations For The Omicron Variant

Fact Check

  • by: Marlo Lee
Fact Check: Pfizer Scientists Did NOT Warn Of Weekly Vaccinations For The Omicron Variant Satire

Did Pfizer scientists warn the public that weekly vaccinations would need to begin to provide protection against the Omicron variant? No, that's not true: This claim is in an article from a website that defines itself as a "financial satire site." A representative from Pfizer also told Lead Stories that there is no evidence that weekly vaccinations would be beneficial.

The story originated in an article published by The Stonk Market on December 1, 2021, titled "Pfizer Scientists Warn Weekly Vaccinations May Be Needed For Omicron Variant COVID-19 To Prevent Lockdown" (archived here). It opened:

Pfizer scientists released a shocking new statement saying that Pfizer is working on developing a weekly vaccination booster system to help prevent the spread of the new emerging COVID-19 mutation, Omicron.

Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail:

Pfizer Scientists Warn Weekly Vaccinations May Be Needed For Omicron Variant COVID-19 To Prevent Lockdown - The Stonk Market

This is what the article looked like at the time of writing:

Screen Shot 2021-12-10 at 10.09.19 AM.png

(Source: The Stonk Market screenshot taken on Fri Dec 10 14:15:38 2021 UTC)

At the bottom of The Stonk Market website is a disclaimer saying that this is a satirical website about finance:

TheStonkMarket.com is a financial satire site ... Mission: To provide daily humor and make stonks go up.

We emailed Pfizer for a comment on this claim. They responded on December 10, 2021, saying:

We have not made any statement and there is no evidence that we need weekly vaccinations.

A Google search of the key words "pfizer weekly vaccination for omicron variant" resulted in no reliable reports on weekly vaccinations.

According to Dictionary.com, "stonks" is Internet slang for the word "stock." The word is purposefully misspelled and is used to refer to money-losing stocks in a humorous way.

Want to inform others about the accuracy of this story?

See who is sharing it (it might even be your friends...) and leave the link in the comments.:

Lead Stories is working with the CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance, a coalition of more than 100 fact-checkers who are fighting misinformation related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about the alliance here.

Marlo Lee is a fact checker at Lead Stories. She is a graduate of Howard University with a B.S. in Biology. Her interest in fact checking started in college, when she realized how important it became in American politics. She lives in Maryland.

Read more about or contact

About us

International Fact-Checking Organization

Lead Stories is a fact checking website that is always looking for the latest false, deceptive or inaccurate stories (or media) making the rounds on the internet.
Spotted something? Let us know!.

Lead Stories is a:


Follow us on social media

Most Read

Most Recent

Share your opinion