Fake News: Mortuary Employee NOT Cremated by Mistake While Taking a Nap

Hoax Alert

  • by: Maarten Schenk
Fake News: Mortuary Employee NOT Cremated by Mistake While Taking a Nap

Fake news website National News Bulletin published a hoax article titled "Mortuary Employee Cremated by Mistake While Taking a Nap". It opens in a familiar way:

An employee of Themba Hospital in Mpumalanga who works at mortuary died this morning, after being accidentally cremated by one of his coworkers.

According to the SAPS in White River, 48-year old Stanley Fakude decided to take a nap on a stretcher after working for sixteen hours straight.

While he was sleeping, another employee mistook him for the corpse of a 52-year old car accident victim and carried him to the crematory.

Familiar, if you are a regular reader of Lead Stories anyway. It is an almost verbatim copy of an earlier hoax from World News Daily Report we debunked, which went like this:

Beaumont, Texas | An employee of the Jefferson County morgue died this morning, after being accidentally cremated by one of his coworkers.

According to the Beaumont Police Department, 48-year old Henri Paul Johnson decided to take a nap one a stretcher after working for sixteen hours straight.

While he was sleeping, another employee mistook him for the corpse of a 52-year old car accident victim and carried him to the crematory.

What an amazing coincidence that the same fake events happened in two different places to two different people with exactly the same age who worked exactly the same number of hours straight and were both cremated instead of 52-year old car accident victims. That, or these fake news websites just like to get lazy with their copy-pasting.

Oh, and that photo of the 'victim'?

victim.jpg

Looks like the hoaxers just googled 'South Africa Black Man' or something similar and found this video tited "south african black singing man indian song" before taking a screenshot:

The new version of the hoax is being shared around already as you can see in the Trendolizer graph at the end of this article. If you notice anyone spreading it (or maybe a new variation in a different country or city) you can help them by pointing them to this article here because nobody likes being fooled by fake news.

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Lead Stories is a fact checking website that is always looking for the latest false, deceptive or inaccurate stories (or media) making the rounds on the internet.
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