Fake News: Pope Francis Did NOT Say "It's All A Load Of Bollocks", Did NOT Stun Crowd At Papal Mass

Hoax Alert

  • by: Maarten Schenk
Fake News: Pope Francis Did NOT Say "It's All A Load Of Bollocks", Did NOT Stun Crowd At Papal Mass

Did the Pope claim the catholic religion was "a load of bollocks" at a mass during his visit to Ireland? No, that's not true: the story making the claim was made up by a satirical website, it is not real. Don't just believe anything people on the internet tell you...

The story originated from an article published by the Waterford Whispers News on August 26, 2018 titled ""It's All A Load Of Bollocks" Pope Stuns Crowd At Papal Mass" (archived here) which opened:

SHRUGGING his shoulders in a dismissive motion, Pope Francis stunned crowds at Phoenix Park by diverting wildly from the traditional Catholic mass before giving it to pilgrims straight.

"It's all a load of bollocks," the Pontiff began in Italian which was translated to the crowd, leaving dozens of worshippers fainting where they stood, "seriously, if someone was in charge of this world they'd have intervened by now.

The Pope's crackling voice continued to impart the belief that the religion which he presides over is complete and utter nonsense as dazed audience members covered their ears.

Many people on social media who only saw this title, description and thumbnail possibly mistook it for a real article:

"It's All A Load Of Bollocks" Pope Stuns Crowd At Papal Mass

SHRUGGING his shoulders in a dismissive motion, Pope Francis stunned crowds at Phoenix Park by diverting wildly from the traditional Catholic mass before giving it to pilgrims straight. "It's all a load of bollocks," the Pontiff began in Italian which ...

However the site Whaterford Whispers News has a disclaimer page which reads:

Disclaimer
Waterford Whispers News is a fabricated satirical newspaper and comedy website published by Waterford Whispers News.

Waterford Whispers News uses invented names in all its stories, except in cases when public figures are being satirized. Any other use of real names is accidental and coincidental.

For that reason alone you should probably never believe anything they publish.

We wrote about waterfordwhispersnews.com before, here are our most recent articles that mention the site:

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  Maarten Schenk

Lead Stories co-founder Maarten Schenk is our resident expert on fake news and hoax websites. He likes to go beyond just debunking trending fake news stories and is endlessly fascinated by the dazzling variety of psychological and technical tricks used by the people and networks who intentionally spread made-up things on the internet.  He can often be found at conferences and events about fake news, disinformation and fact checking when he is not in his office in Belgium monitoring and tracking the latest fake article to go viral.

Read more about or contact Maarten Schenk

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