Fact Check: Stillbirths Are NOT Rampant Among Fully Vaccinated Mothers

Fact Check

  • by: Alexis Tereszcuk
Fact Check: Stillbirths Are NOT Rampant Among Fully Vaccinated Mothers False Numbers

Are stillbirths rampant among fully vaccinated mothers? No, that's not true. The claim that there is a spike in stillbirths among mothers who had received a full COVID-19 vaccine is not supported by any evidence. It was made by a doctor in Canada and was denied by two Canadian health care organizations, and is the opposite of statistics published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The claim was made by a doctor whose false COVID-19 claims have been previously debunked by Lead Stories.

The claim appeared as an article published by Gateway Pundit on December 11, 2021, titled "(VIDEO) Doctor Warns Stillbirths Are Rampant Among Fully Vaccinated Mothers, Launches Investigation" (archived here) which opened:

The Center For Disease Control and the federal government is adamant that pregnant women get a COVID-19 injection. But data doesn't support its safety and health practitioners around the world are sounding the alarm. A Canadian doctor, who has effectively treated COVID patients with Ivermectin throughout, urges pregnant women to abstain from getting the COVID...

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(VIDEO) Doctor Warns Stillbirths Are Rampant Among Fully Vaccinated Mothers, Launches Investigation

The Center For Disease Control and the federal government is adamant that pregnant women get a COVID-19 injection. But data doesn't support its safety and health practitioners around the world are sounding the alarm. A Canadian doctor, who has effectively treated COVID patients with Ivermectin throughout, urges pregnant women to abstain from getting the COVID...

The article continued:

Speaking to a reporter in November, Dr. Daniel Nagase argues COVID vaccines are directly attributed to an alarming increase in stillbirths across Canada.
Doulas who work in women and children's hospitals in one of the birthing centers for Vancouver "had 13 stillbirths in a 24-hour period," Nagase contends.
"In Waterloo, Ontario, I have a more reliable statistic," he continued. "There were 86 stillbirths between January and July. Normally, it's only five or six stillbirths every year. So, about one stillbirth every two months is the usual rate. To suddenly get to 86 stillbirths in six months, that's highly unusual," he continued. "But the most important confirmation that we have from the Waterloo, Ontario report was that all of the 86 stillbirths were fully vaccinated."

Nagase claims he has successfully treated patients with COVID-19 with ivermectin, an anti-parasitic drug that is not recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) nor by manufacturer Merck for treatment against the virus. The Canadian Broadcast Corporation debunked his claims regarding stillbirths in women who received a full COVID-19 vaccine, and noted the hospital where he previously worked said he was under review for his "extremely disappointing" conduct and was not scheduled for upcoming shifts at the hospital.

Lead Stories has debunked the claim by Nagase that messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccines instruct cells to produce "non-human" proteins -- spike proteins -- that would stunt the development of children's immune systems. On the contrary, the purpose of spike proteins produced by mRNA COVID vaccines is to assist in triggering the body's immune system and help the body recognize the SARS-CoV-2 virus and attack it.

Vancouver Coastal Health, the regional health authority, published a series of tweets on its official account @VCHhealthcare denying the claims made by Nagase, calling them "rumours and disinformation." The health agency's tweets were posted on November 23, 2021, 18 days before the Gateway Pundit published its story.

Grand River Hospital in Waterloo also posted a debunk on its official Twitter account @grhospitalkw on November 26, 2021, writing that stillbirth rates "remain steady at 0.2 and 0.4 per cent," and are "lower than the national average." The message read:

The CDC published a report on November 26, 2021 titled, "Risk for Stillbirth Among Women With and Without COVID-19 at Delivery Hospitalization -- United States, March 2020-September 2021." The report noted, "Pregnant women are at increased risk for severe disease from COVID-19, and COVID-19 is associated with an increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes":

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Lead Stories previously debunked a claim that falsely asserted the New England Journal of Medicine found women who received the COVID-19 vaccine -- within 30 days of becoming pregnant and up to 20 weeks pregnant -- had a miscarriage rate of 82%.

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Lead Stories is working with the CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance, a coalition of more than 100 fact-checkers who are fighting misinformation related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about the alliance here.


  Alexis Tereszcuk

Alexis Tereszcuk is a writer and fact checker at Lead Stories and an award-winning journalist who spent over a decade breaking hard news and celebrity scoop with RadarOnline and Us Weekly.

As the Entertainment Editor, she investigated Hollywood stories and conducted interviews with A-list celebrities and reality stars.  

Alexis’ crime reporting earned her spots as a contributor on the Nancy Grace show, CNN, Fox News and Entertainment Tonight, among others.

Read more about or contact Alexis Tereszcuk

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