Fact Check: The Story About Police Stopping Man From 'Dumping LSD Into L.A. Water Supply' Is NOT True

Fact Check

  • by: Sarah Thompson
Fact Check: The Story About Police Stopping Man From 'Dumping LSD Into L.A. Water Supply' Is NOT True Old Fake Story

Did police stop a man from dumping LSD into the Los Angeles water supply? No, that's not true: This story originated on a satire website in 2017, but reappeared on various questionable websites without the proper satire warnings.

One example is an article published by 97x.com on July 30, 2018, titled "Police Stop Man From Dumping LSD Into L.A. Water Supply" (archived here) which opened:

Police in Los Angeles have thwarted and apparent plot by a man to dump a whole bunch of hallucinogenic drugs into the city's water supply.

43-year-old Alexander S. Crow is a former chemist and used to work for Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. He stands accused of trying to dump 251-NBOMe, a synthetic drug that mimics LSD, into the water supply. He's a member of a group called Psychedelic Rainbow Warrior Peace Force, which aims to promote the legalization of such drugs.

Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail:

Police Stop Man From Dumping LSD Into L.A. Water Supply

Police in Los Angeles have thwarted and apparent plot by a man to dump a whole bunch of hallucinogenic drugs into the city's water supply.

The mugshot photo featured in this story appeared in a June 15, 2011, collection, "Worst Mugshots in Florida" from ebaumsworld.com (here), (archived here).

The article originally was published by worldnewsdailyreport.com (here) (archived here) under the title, "MAN'S PLOT TO DUMP TONS OF LSD IN L.A. WATER SUPPLY THWARTED BY POLICE" on December 19, 2017.

World News Daily report has this disclaimer at the bottom of its webpage:

World News Daily Report assumes all responsibility for the satirical nature of its articles and for the fictional nature of their content. All characters appearing in the articles in this website - even those based on real people - are entirely fictional and any resemblance between them and any person, living, dead or undead, is purely a miracle.

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  Sarah Thompson

Sarah Thompson lives with her family and pets on a small farm in Indiana. She founded a Facebook page and a blog called “Exploiting the Niche” in 2017 to help others learn about manipulative tactics and avoid scams on social media. Since then she has collaborated with journalists in the USA, Canada and Australia and since December 2019 she works as a Social Media Authenticity Analyst at Lead Stories.


 

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